Archive for August, 2008

Post #9 : Chewing gum after surgery may help recovery

August 30, 2008

      According to an article, British researchers have discovered a relationship between chewing gum and recovery from abdominal surgery. In a review of several small studies, they have came to the conclusion that chewing gum following abdominal surgery may help in recovery. The studied involved five randomized trials involving 158 patients who had undergone colectomy, a surgical procedure which completely or partially removes the colon. Half of the patients were told to chew gum after their operations. The guts of the patients who chewed gum became active more quickly. Not only this, but the patients who chewed gum lowered their incidence of obstruction to the bowel. Four out of the five studies found that the length of postoperative stay in the hospital were shorter for gum chewers than for those who did not. The mechanism is unclear, however doctors believe that chewing gum does have an effect on activating the gut.

Post #8 : Don’t crack your neck!

August 30, 2008

      Even at school, you see many people cracking their necks. Many adults in Korea see chiropractors to relieve pain and they get their necks cracked by them. Although adjusting your neck is supposed to relieve pain and you do it without thinking most of the time, an article states that neurologists have noticed a relationship between neck adjustments and strokes. The technical term for neck cracking, “cervical spinal manipulation,” involves the twisting of the neck. Although people believe that this technique relieves pain, they are taking risks when they get their necks adjusted. Neurologists have hypothesized that this kind of activity could damage the two major arteries that go to the back of the brain. A study conducted indicated that young stroke patients under the age of 45 were five times more likely to have cracked their necks within a week of their stroke than normal people. Other studies disproved this hypothesis. One of these studies stated that strokes were linked to arterial dissections at the back of the neck. Young patients with neck and back pain could have gone to see chiropractors for relief, not realizing that their ailments were symptoms of strokes or arterial dissections. In short, you should be careful when getting neck manipulations as they may carry a small risk of strokes. 

Cervical Spinal Manipulation

Cervical Spinal Manipulation

 

Post #7 : Response to “So Young, and So Gadgeted” by Warren B.

August 28, 2008

After reading “So Young, and So Gadgeted,” I believe that children should get their first cellphone, laptop or virtual persona in middle school when they start learning how to take care of their goods. Before this age, I believe, children will lose and wreck their new gadgets.

According to the Loose Leaf Library Springhouse Corporation, Piaget is the most influential child development psychologist who found the “secrets of human learning hidden behind the seemingly illogical notions of children.” He believed that “children were not empty vessels to be filled with knowledge but active builders of knowledge who were constantly creating and testing their own theories of the world.” He also began to “suspect that the key to human knowledge could be discovered by observing how the child’s mind develops.”

Piaget “identified four states of cognitive development by catching his own children.” “Sensorimotor” was the first stage. During this stage children learn about themselves and their environments through actions—they learn that they are separate from their environments and that the objects and people in their environments continue to exist even though they are outside the reach of their senses.
The second state, the “preoperational” stage (ages 3-5) takes place when children first attempt to represent objects by using symbols. Children gain the ability to think about things and events that are not present. Despite this fact, thinking is still influenced by fantasy.
From ages 6-11 children enter the “concrete” stage during which they learn how to think abstractly and make rational judgments about concrete or observable events.
Children at the ages 12 and up have entered the “formal operational” stage in which they are reaching the cognitive functioning of adults. Children are now able to make rational judgments without concrete objects or observable events.

I believe that there aren’t any “gadgets” that I don’t currently have that I would want next year as a college student. But, I would definitely want a new laptop when I go to college.

Post #6 : Response to “In Grand Olympic Show, Some Sleight of Voice” by Jim Y.

August 21, 2008

According to the article, “In Grand Olympic Show, Some Sleight of Voice,” in the opening ceremony of the 2008 Beijing Olympics, the Chinese lied to the whole world; they used the appearance of a cute girl and the voice of another. Both girls had different strengths and weaknesses; Miaoke was cute but she was not a good singer and Peiyi was not as cute as Miaoke but was a good singer. Despite this fact, lip syncing at an international ceremony was not a good idea. Using two different girls reminded the world once again about its obsession over physical beauty.

Although lip syncing was not a wise decision, lying to the world was not a bad idea. If the Chinese had not lied and had told the public about their decision to use two girls, the public would have condemned the idea, stating that the Chinese were people who valued external beauty over inner beauty. If the Chinese did not get caught lying, lying to the public would have been okay and Miaoke would have stayed in their minds as the cute girl at the opening ceremony of the 2008 Beijing Olympics. If the world found out, the Chinese would have received the same criticism as they would have if they had announced their plan to the whole world. Therefore, I believe that lying to the world was a better choice in that the Chinese had a chance to fool the whole world and avoid criticisms of any sort.

Miaoke and Peiyi

Miaoke and Peiyi

Post #5 : Surgeons

August 3, 2008

Surgeons

          Surgeons are physicians who perform operations on patients in order to repair injuries, prevent diseases, correct abnormalities and in general to improve the health of the patients. General surgeons perform various operations while specialized surgeons such as neurosurgeons and orthopedic surgeons perform specific surgeries. To become a surgeon you need to be able to have patience, good hand-eye coordination, good hands, knowledge in science, fine vision, and good communication skills. Surgeons work long hours in hospitals, taking care of patients in need of surgery, taking care of patients who have gone through surgery, and performing operations. Surgeons spend most of their time standing and therefore must be physically fit. The average salary for a general surgeon is $ 300,000 per year. Surgeons play a big role in keeping people healthy. Without surgeons, the life expectancy of human beings would have stayed low.

Surgeons

Surgeons